Birds

Photos: Monomorphism in Birds

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Feathers set birds apart from any other animal on Earth. Plumage has a variety of important biological functions, including social signaling and survival.

Differences in size, color, weight, and over all appearance are examples of dimorphism in birds. Birds that do not exhibit key differences in size, color, and over all appearance are considered monomorphic.

Below are examples of birds that are monomorphic, or near monomorphic.

Canada Geese

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Canada Geese. Image Credit: Animal Perspectives.

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Canada Geese. Image Credit: Animal Perspectives.

American Crow

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American Crows. Image Credit: Animal Perspectives.

Cedar Waxwing

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Cedar Waxwing. Image Credit: Animal Perspectives.

Chipping Sparrow

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Chipping Sparrows. Image Credit: Animal Perspectives.

European Starling

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European Starlings. Image Credit: Animal Perspectives.

Black Vulture

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Black Vulture.  Image Credit: Animal Perspectives.

Killdeer

Killdeer. Image Credit: Animal Perspectives.

Killdeer. Image Credit: Animal Perspectives.

Brown Creeper

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Brown Creeper. Image Credit: Animal Perspectives.

Greater Yellowlegs

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Greater Yellowlegs. Image Credit: Animal Perspectives.

Egrets

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Great Egrets and Snowy Egrets. Image Credit: Animal Perspectives.

Bald Eagle

This one was also hand held.

Bald Eagle. Image Credit: Animal Perspectives.

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Also read…

Sexual Dimorphism in Birds

3 Tips for Successful Nest Monitoring

Nesting Season Part III: The Right Box for You

Wordless Wednesday: Black-Crowned Night Heron

Where the Screech Owl Wasn’t

List: The 16 Dos and Don’ts of Managing Your Nesting Boxes

5 Birds to Know in the Northeast this Spring

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